onigirazu

Just after I wrote about chigiri pan or pull apart bread buns in my previous post, I came to know about onigirazu, another (not too new) food trend in Japan.

I was at the local bookstore browsing the shelves of cookbooks when the text “不用捏饭团” on a book spine caught my attention. The Chinese text means rice ball or “onigiri” that is made without having to shape or squeeze.

“Onigirazu” or “不用捏饭团” are basically rice balls made by wrapping layers of rice and fillings with a square sheet of seaweed into a parcel which is then sliced into half, just like a sandwich. Due to the square shape and wrapping method, onigirazu are more versatile than onigiri when it comes to the choices of the fillings. You can wrap it with ham, sausages, eggs (be it hard boiled, scrambled, sunny-side-ups), tuna, salmon, cheese, pork cutlets, salad greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, ladies fingers, etc, etc.

For my first attempt at making onigirazu, I wrapped them with Korean spicy stir-fried pork, egg and salad greens. I seasoned the rice with some sesame oil and salt to make it more flavourful. Everyone enjoyed this humble and delicious lunch especially my younger child who loves seaweed wrapped rice balls, be it onigiri, maki or kimbap, and now onigirazu 😉

If you are interested to give these rice sandwiches a try, you may want to refer to this article which provides a tutorial on how to go about making them. Have fun!

Indiana’s close loss to South Carolina in Sweet Sixteen highlights how bright the future is

ALBANY, NY – Nobody thought Indiana would even be close. The consensus was that Indiana would have to play a perfect game to even compete with No. 1-seed South Carolina and even then the Hoosiers would be lucky to keep …

The post Indiana’s close loss to South Carolina in Sweet Sixteen highlights how bright the future is appeared first on Inside the Hall | Indiana Hoosiers Basketball News, Recruiting and Analysis.

Traditional Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua)

WHY YOU’LL LOVE THIS RECIPE: Our celebratory Traditional Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua) will delight with its enriched, brioche-like, lightly sweet dough and spring-perfect colorfully dyed eggs. It will be the star of your Easter dinner or any celebration!

  • This eggy bread undergoes a two-stage fermentation process that adds complexity and flavor. Orange and anise give the Pane di Pasqua brightness and a delightful aroma.
  • Dyed raw eggs are placed on top and cooked along with the bread. A generous drizzle of glossy orange glaze is the irresistible final touch. 

Easter is a big religious holiday in Ireland, and it’s also a celebration of spring and new life. In addition to the Easter symbols of lambs, chicks, and eggs, the Irish love their chocolate at Easter time! Bigger Bolder Baking is chock full of recipes perfect for celebrating Easter and the beauty of spring. You’ll love Easy Simnel Cake (Easter Fruitcake), Lemon Meringue Cake, and 5 Big and Bold Easter Recipes (including Chocolate Easter Eggs and Baby Chick Vanilla Cupcakes!)

Table of Contents

Traditional Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua) is golden, light and fluffy. It's decorated with colorful Easter eggs and drizzled with icing.

What is Traditional Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua)

  • Traditional Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua) is a brioche-like sweet bread formed and baked in a wreath shape. Festively-colored Easter eggs, glaze, and sprinkles adorn the top of the bread.
  • This Pane di Pasqua is flavored with orange oil, zest, aniseed, and vanilla. This classic combination brings the sunny taste and fragrance of the Mediterranean to your holiday table.
  • Forms of Easter bread go back centuries in Italy and contain religious symbolism. The wreath shape signifies the crown of thorns and is also seen as the circle of life. The eggs stand for rebirth and hope. Different regions have their own Italian Easter bread recipes with various flavorings like honey or lemon zest, or varieties of fruits and nuts.

Tools You Need for Italian Easter Bread

Key Ingredients for Italian Easter Bread and Why

  • For the colored eggs:

    • Eggs

      • Use white eggs here for beautifully vivid results.
    • Vinegar

      • Vinegar’s acidity reacts with the calcium carbonate in the eggshell. This makes a more porous surface for the dye to penetrate and bond with so the colors last.
    • Food coloring

      • Food coloring comes in liquid, gel, or coloring tablet form.
      • For this recipe we found it best to use gel food dye for a much stronger color.
  • For the sponge and the dough:

    • All-purpose flour

      • With a protein content of 9-11%, all-purpose flour creates the perfect chewy and soft texture.
    • Granulated sugar

      • Sugar feeds yeast, converting it into gas, making the dough rise and making the rolls light and airy.
      • Sugar helps to retain moisture in the dough.
    • Instant yeast

      • Instant yeast does not require sponging and gives a quicker, more efficient rise than active dry yeast.
      • If you use active dry yeast: for every teaspoon of instant yeast, use 1 ¼ teaspoons of active dry yeast. Bring the liquid in your recipe to blood temperature and mix in active dry yeast. Let it sit at room temperature for roughly 5 minutes until foam forms on top.
    • Salt

      • Salt enhances the flavor of the Easter bread and strengthens the gluten, giving it the perfect crumb.
      • Salt also relaxes the dough so that it’s easier to shape.
    • Eggs

      • Using eggs yields plush, rich bread.
      • For best results, get your refrigerated eggs to room temperature before you mix your dough.
      • The egg wash (one egg mixed with a tablespoon of milk) gives the crust an attractive golden shine.
    • Butter

      • Butter contributes to the bread’s moisture, helping keep it soft and tender.
      • Make sure your butter is softened correctly. Specifically, you’ll know it’s soft enough when you push the butter, and it makes an indent, but your finger doesn’t easily squish right through.
    • Fiori di Sicilia

      • Instead of Fiori di Sicilia you can use 1/4 teaspoon of each vanilla extract and orange oil that is commonly used in this bread.
    • Aniseed

      • These seeds from an anise plant have a slightly sweet licorice flavor.
      • Aniseed gives Pane di Pasqua unique flavor, a delicious fragrance, and a slight crunch.
  • For the glaze:

    • Powdered sugar

      • Powdered sugar, also called confectioners’ or icing sugar, is the main ingredient in the bread’s glossy glaze.
    • Orange juice

      • Sweet and bracing orange juice makes the glaze deeply flavorful.
    • Sprinkles

      • Sprinkles make this bread holiday-ready and echo the festive Easter egg colors.

Step-by-step instructions on how to make Traditional Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua) : adding sprinkles to the icing of the bread.

How to Make Traditional  Italian Easter Bread

  • Dye the eggs: 
    • Fill six small bowls with a cup of water, a teaspoon of vinegar, and six different shades of food coloring. Color the eggs in the food coloring for 10 to 15 minutes.
    • If you want intense, vivid colors, keep them in longer. Dry on a wire rack and refrigerate until needed.
  • Make the sponge: Combine flour, yeast, and water, cover with plastic wrap, and let sit at room temperature overnight.
  • Mix the dough:
    • The next day, using your stand mixer, combine the prepared sponge mixture with the other dough ingredients (flour, sugar, yeast, salt, butter, eggs, egg yolk, Fiori di Sicilia, orange zest, and aniseed) until you have a soft, smooth dough.
    • Put the dough in an oiled bowl, cover, and let rise until doubled, about two hours.
  • Shape the dough:
    • Divide the dough in half, and shape each half into a 20-inch (50 cm) rope. Twist the ropes together and bring the ends together to make a circle.
    • Cover and proof on a parchment-lined tray for 1 hour or until doubled.
  • Bake the bread: 
    • Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C). Carefully pull the ropes apart and nestle a dyed egg in the bread. Repeat around the wreath with the rest of the eggs.
    • Brush the bread with egg wash (one egg whisked with one tablespoon of milk). Bake for 15 minutes. Lower the heat to 350°F (180°C) and bake for 20 more minutes until golden brown. Let the bread cool completely.
  • Glaze the bread: Mix the powdered sugar with two tablespoons of milk. Add a few more milk if you want a thinner glaze. Drizzle over the bread and top with sprinkles.

Can I Make Traditional Italian Easter Bread in Advance?

Yes, you can make Traditional Italian Easter Bread in Advance.

    • The bread is best served on the day it’s baked, but you can prepare the dough two days in advance:
      • Make the dough as directed.
      • Transfer the mixed dough to an oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate.
      • The refrigeration slows the yeast activity, and the dough can be refrigerated for up to two days.
      • When ready to bake the bread, let it come to room temperature before shaping it. Follow the rest of the recipe as directed.
    • Additionally, the eggs can be dyed up to two days before and refrigerated.

How to Store Traditional Italian Easter Bread

Store leftover bread in an airtight container at room temperature for up to two days.

Traditional Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua) is golden, light and fluffy. It's decorated with colorful Easter eggs, drizzled with icing and topped with colorful sprinkles.

FAQs

  • What’s the purpose of making a sponge for Italian Easter Bread?

    • A sponge is also called a starter, preferment, or pre-ferment. Using a sponge enhances the bread’s flavor and texture.
    • Flour, yeast, and water are mixed and set aside to ferment. The sponge is mixed with the remaining ingredients to make the final dough.
  • My dough seems too wet—how do I fix it?

    • This brioche bread like dough is meant to be sticky. Its soft texture is what makes Pane di Pasqua so tender when baked.
    • If it’s absolutely necessary, you can add a minimal amount of flour but use as little as possible.
  • How do I ensure my Italian Easter Bread gets a perfect rise?

    • If your dough didn’t rise, check whether your yeast is expired. Also, storing yeast in the fridge or freezer will keep it fresh longer.
    • Salt does retard yeast growth, and in concentrations that are too high, it can kill the yeast. Keep salt and yeast separate, or mix each with flour first.
    • Do not over-proof or under-proof the dough. The telltale sign you use is how your dough looks: if the dough has doubled in size, almost feels lighter but still strong, and a finger indent doesn’t spring back right away, then it’s ready.

A close-up shot at the Traditional Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua) . A slice is cut and being lifted from the pan. The bread is golden, light and fluffy, and decorated with colorful Easter eggs, drizzled with icing and topped with colorful sprinkles.

Gemma’s Pro Chef Tips

  • This dough is very soft and sticky, which creates a very tender texture. It is best to use a stand mixer, as kneading by hand will be challenging.
  • The eggs are not hard-boiled: they are raw, and bake in the oven along with the bread.
  • Instead of the bread ring, you can make small, individual rolls instead:
    • Dye ten eggs and divide the dough into ten equal portions.
    • For each portion, divide the dough in half, shape each half into a rope, twist them together, and bring the ends together to form a small wreath.
    • Nestle an egg in the center.
    • The baking time may be a bit shorter, so keep a close eye on the bread while it’s baking.
  • Instead of Fiori di Sicilia you can use a 1/4 teaspoon of each vanilla extract and orange oil that is commonly used in this bread.

More Festive Bread Recipes

Traditional Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua) is golden, light and fluffy, and decorated with colorful Easter eggs, drizzled with icing and topped with colorful sprinkles.

Print

Traditional Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua)

#wprm-recipe-user-rating-0 .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-full svg * { fill: #343434; }#wprm-recipe-user-rating-0 .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-33 svg * { fill: url(#wprm-recipe-user-rating-0-33); }#wprm-recipe-user-rating-0 .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-50 svg * { fill: url(#wprm-recipe-user-rating-0-50); }#wprm-recipe-user-rating-0 .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-66 svg * { fill: url(#wprm-recipe-user-rating-0-66); }linearGradient#wprm-recipe-user-rating-0-33 stop { stop-color: #343434; }linearGradient#wprm-recipe-user-rating-0-50 stop { stop-color: #343434; }linearGradient#wprm-recipe-user-rating-0-66 stop { stop-color: #343434; }

.st0{fill:#FFFFFF;}

.st0{fill:#FFFFFF;}

.st0{fill:#FFFFFF;}

.st0{fill:#FFFFFF;}

.st0{fill:#FFFFFF;}

Craft this festive Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua) and celebrate Easter with a traditionally braided ring of sweet, spiced perfection.
Prep Time 1 hour
Cook Time 35 minutes
Proof time 14 hours
Total Time 15 hours 35 minutes
Servings 10 servings
Author Gemma Stafford

Ingredients

For the Dyed Eggs

  • 6 white eggs, uncooked
  • 6 teaspoons vinegar
  • Gel food coloring, of your choice

For the Sponge

  • 1 cup (5 oz/142 g) all-purpose flour
  • teaspoon instant yeast
  • ½ cup (4 fl oz/120 ml) water, at room temperature

For the Dough

  • 2 cup (10 oz/284 g) all-purpose flour
  • cup (2 ½ oz/71 g) granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • teaspoons salt
  • ¼ cup (2 oz/57 g) butter, softened
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 large egg yolk, at room temperature
  • ½ teaspoon Fiori di Sicilia Citrus Flavor*
  • ¼ teaspoon aniseed
  • Zest of 1 orange
  • Egg wash

For the Glaze

Instructions

The Day Before

    Dye the Eggs

    • Fill six small bowls with 1 cup (8 fl oz/240 ml) of water. Add 1 teaspoon of vinegar to each bowl and add a few drops of different food coloring to each bowl until you get your desired colors.
    • Add an egg to each bowl and turn in the colored water for 5-10 minutes, until the eggs take on the color you want.
    • Transfer to a wire rack to allow the eggs to dry completely, then refrigerate until needed. This can be done up to 2 days in advance.

    Make the Sponge

    • In a medium bowl, combine the flour, yeast and water and cover with plastic wrap. Let sit on the counter overnight.

    The Next Day

      Make the Dough

      • The next day, using a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, mix the sponge with all of the dough ingredients: flour, sugar, yeast, salt, butter, eggs, yolk, vanilla extract, orange oil, aniseed and orange zest on low speed for about 10 minutes, until you have a very soft, smooth dough that clears the sides of the bowl but remains stuck to the bottom. If absolutely needed, add a touch more flour, but use as little as possible.
      • Transfer to an oiled bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 2 hours.

      Shaping the Dough

      • Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
      • Divide the dough in half and roll each piece into a 20-inch (50 cm) long log. Twist the logs together and then bring the ends together to form a circle.
      • Carefully transfer to the prepared baking sheet and lightly cover with plastic wrap. Let rise again until doubled, about 1 hour.

      Bake the Bread

      • Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C).
      • Carefully pull the rope strands apart and nestle the eggs in the wreath, then brush all over with egg wash.
      • Bake for 15 minutes, then lower the heat to 350°F (180°C) and bake for another 20 minutes. If the bread begins to overbrown, then tent it with foil for the remainder of the bake time. Remove from the oven to cool completely.

      Make the Glaze

      • In a small bowl, combine the powdered sugar and 2 tablespoons of milk. If you would like a thinner glaze, add a little more orange juice, a few drops at a time, until you get the consistency you want. Drizzle the bread with the glaze and add the sprinkles on top. Let the glaze dry before serving.
      • This is best the day it is made but you can store the leftovers in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 days.

        Note we do not recommend eating the eggs.

      Notes

      • This dough is very soft and sticky, which creates a very tender texture. It is best to use a stand mixer, as kneading by hand will be challenging.
      • The eggs are not hard-boiled: they are raw, and bake in the oven along with the bread.
      • Instead of the bread ring, you can make small, individual rolls instead:
        • Dye ten eggs and divide the dough into ten equal portions.
        • For each portion, divide the dough in half, shape each half into a rope, twist them together, and bring the ends together to form a small wreath.
        • Nestle an egg in the center.
        • The baking time may be a bit shorter, so keep a close eye on the bread while it’s baking.
      • Instead of Fiori di Sicilia you can use a 1/4 teaspoon of each vanilla extract and orange oil that is commonly used in this bread.

      The post Traditional Italian Easter Bread (Pane di Pasqua) appeared first on Gemma’s Bigger Bolder Baking.

      Crockpot Spaghetti Sauce

      Cooked low and slow for a rich flavor, this crockpot spaghetti sauce is deceptively easy to make. Your family will never guess that you only spent a few minutes of hands-on time making this sauce!

      White pasta bowl holding spaghetti topped with spaghetti sauce.

      I am a big fan of easy dinner recipes.

      With two young kids, I need all the help I can get when it comes to getting dinner on the table. And often that help is my slow cooker.

      From crockpot taco soup and crockpot mississippi pot roast to easy crockpot pulled pork, I love being able to “set it and forget it” until it’s time to eat. 

      Spaghetti is always a hit around here, so this crockpot spaghetti sauce is my new favorite weeknight dinner recipe. Sometimes I will even make a double batch so we can eat some right away and freeze the rest for later.

      (more…)

      The post Crockpot Spaghetti Sauce appeared first on My Baking Addiction.

      Pumpkin Olive Oil Cake with Maple Olive Oil Glaze from Snacking Cakes

      This one-bowl Pumpkin Olive Oil Cake with Maple Olive Oil Glaze is as easy as can be. It’s a great alternative to pie for Thanksgiving too. The maple olive oil glaze is sweet and savory all at once and has the most velvety texture.

      If you’re feeling to tired or to stressed for pie this Thanksgiving, or maybe you just don’t like pie (I know you’re out there!) – let me humbly suggest this Pumpkin Olive Oil Cake that comes together in one bowl without much fuss. You have probably guessed this already, but it’s a recipe from my new book Snacking Cakes!

      It has all of the warm spices you could possibly want, and is topped with maple olive oil glaze and a pinch of sea salt for a sweet and savory vibe that makes it a great snack for anytime of day. You might even want to make one now to snack on as you’re cooking today and tomorrow…Just a thought!

      It’s the perfect size for the small gatherings we are all having this year, and if you have leftovers they make an excellent breakfast the next day. We baked it as a loaf for the book, but you can certainly bake it in a round or square pan too.

      Stay safe out there everyone. Happy Thanksgiving!


      Pumpkin Olive Oil Cake with Maple Olive Oil Glaze from Snacking Cakes

      Pumpkin cake isn’t just for the fall, and this version, spiked with a bit of allspice and black pepper, has a hit of warmth that makes it more exciting than your average pumpkin spice mix. The glaze has a sweet and savory thing going on that pairs beautifully with the spices. If you prefer your pumpkin cake unadorned, feel free to skip the glaze and just sprinkle a few tablespoons of untoasted pepitas over the top of the cake batter before it goes into the oven.

      Pumpkin Olive Oil Cake

      1 cup (200g) light brown sugar

      2 large eggs


      1 cup (230g) pumpkin puree


      ½ cup (120ml) olive oil

      1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

      ½ teaspoon ground cardamom

      1/8 teaspoon ground allspice

      A few grinds of black pepper

      ½ teaspoon kosher salt

      1½ cups (190g) all-purpose our

      1 teaspoon baking powder

      ½ teaspoon baking soda

      2 tablespoons chopped toasted pepitas (optional)

       

      Maple Olive Oil Glaze

      1 cup (100g) confectioners’ sugar

      2 tablespoons olive oil


      2 tablespoons maple syrup


      1 to 2 tablespoons hot water

      Pinch of kosher salt

      Chopped pepitas (optional)

      Flaky salt (optional)

      1. Position a rack in the center of your oven and preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter or coat an 8-inch square baking pan with nonstick spray. Line the pan with a strip of parchment paper that hangs over two of the edges.

      2. MAKE THE CAKE: In a large bowl, whisk the brown sugar and eggs until pale and foamy, about 1 minute. Add the pumpkin puree, olive oil, cinnamon, cardamom, allspice, pepper, and kosher salt. Whisk until smooth and emulsified.

       3. Add the flour, baking powder, and baking soda and whisk until well-combined and smooth.

      4. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, tap the pan gently on the counter to release any air bubbles, and smooth the top of the batter with an offset spatula. Sprinkle the pepitas over the top if you are not going to glaze the cake.

      5. Bake until puffed and golden, and a tester inserted into the center comes out clean, 25 to 35 minutes. Set the pan on a rack to cool for about 15 minutes. Then use the parchment paper
to lift the cake out of the pan and set it on the rack to cool completely.

      6. MAKE THE GLAZE: Combine the confectioners’ sugar, olive oil, maple syrup, 1 tablespoon of the hot water, and a pinch of kosher salt in a medium bowl. Whisk until smooth, adding more water as necessary to make a thick but pourable glaze.

      7. Pour the glaze over the cooled cake and sprinkle with the pepitas and flaky salt, if desired. Let the glaze set for about 20 minutes before slicing the cake. (Store the cake, well wrapped, at room temperature for up to three days.)

      Use Another Pan

      LOAF: Bake in a 9 x 5 x 3-inch loaf pan until puffed and golden, and a skewer inserted into the center comes out clean, 50 to 60 minutes. You’ll need a half batch of glaze to coat the cake in a thin layer.

      ROUND: Bake in a 9-inch round pan until puffed and golden, and a tester inserted into the center comes out clean, 25 to 35 minutes.

      SHEET: Double the ingredients for the cake and bake in a
9 x 13-inch pan until puffed and golden, and a tester inserted into the center comes out clean, 30 to 40 minutes. Double the ingredients for the glaze, too.

      Dress It Up

      Add a dollop of Brown Sugar Whip (page 180) or a scoop of ice cream (or both!) to slices of cake before serving.

      Flavor Variations

      PUMPKIN CHOCOLATE CHIP CAKE: Prepare the cake as directed, then fold in ½ cup (85g) chopped bittersweet chocolate just before pouring the batter into the pan. Top with Cocoa Glaze (page 135).

       RYE PUMPKIN CAKE: Substitute ½ cup (65g) light rye flour for the all-purpose flour. This version is also quite nice with a bit of chocolate folded into the batter.

      Round Steak Beef Stew

      This Round Steak Beef Stew Recipe is a perfect combination of round steak and vegetables, in a rich gravy.  A delicious, hearty recipe that is a meal in a bowl. There is just something about a beef stew that sticks to the ribs longer than other meals.  If you have a “meat and potatoes” fan in your house,…

      Read More

      The post Round Steak Beef Stew appeared first on Barbara Bakes™.

      Best Carrot Cake with Pineapple, Coconut and Pecans

      This Best Carrot Cake Recipe chock full of carrots, nuts, and pineapple is my absolute favorite dessert. With a delectable cream cheese frosting, it’s impossible to resist! A birthday favorite.

      My mom introduced me to a new dessert craze WAY back in the 1970s. She and my dad had devoured slices of moist Carrot Cake with Pineapple on a trip to St. Paul, then brought home the recipe to try in our kitchen.

      Slice of Classic Carrot Cake on a white dessert plate.

      (more…)

      The post Best Carrot Cake with Pineapple, Coconut and Pecans appeared first on That Skinny Chick Can Bake.

      Bacon Gruyere & Tomato Tartlets

      dsc03566

      Such a perfect little bite to eat – these little bites of loveliness are just right whether they’re a snack for hungry hoards after school or gracing the table at an afternoon tea.

      Just one word of warning from me, do not eat one warm from the cooling rack, you won’t be able to stop at just the one and half will have disappeared before anyone else gets a look in!

      Ingredients :

      Pastry

      225g plain flour

      100g butter, cold diced

      Pinch of salt

      1 egg, medium beaten

      1-2 tbsps cold water

      Filling

      80g sweet tomato relish

      200g thick cut bacon (approx. 4 rashers)

      50g Gruyere cheese, grated (use a good strong cheddar if you’d prefer)

      100ml single cream

      1 egg, medium

      Salt and pepper

       

      Oven Temp:       180c(fan)/200c/Gas Mark 6.

      Makes: 12 tartlets

      Freezing:  Suitable for freezing for upto 1 month.

      Method:

      To make the pastry place the flour and cold diced butter in a large mixing bowl or for speed in the bowl of your food processor.

      dsc03584

      Rub the butter into the flour using your fingertips  or blitz with the processor until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.

      dsc03585

      Stir through the pinch of salt and make a well in the centre.

      Add the beaten egg and work into the mixture until the pastry begins to come together, adding a little extra water if necessary.

      dsc03586

      Knead lightly  until smooth.

      dsc03588

      Cover with clingfilm and chill in the fridge for 30 minutes.

      While the pastry rests prepare the filling.  Grill the bacon and allow to cool.

      dsc03589

      Yes I have 5 rashers, the extra one is going on a sandwich for my lunch!

      Trim away the fat and dice into small pieces.

      dsc03605

      In a jug beat together the single cream and egg and season well with salt and pepper.

      Once the pastry has chilled grease the recesses of a 12 hole bun tin.

      Roll out the pastry on a lightly floured worksurface to approx. 4mm in thickness.

      Cut out 12 rounds using a pastry cutter and use to line each recess of the tin.

      dsc03609

      As you cut them out set them on the top of the recess and then carry on cutting out.  As the pastry relaxes it will start to shape into the hollow.

      dsc03610

      Once all 12 are cut out, press them very lightly so that they line the recesses neatly.

      dsc03611

      Add ½ teaspoon of tomato relish to the base of each pastry case.

      dsc03612

      Divide the bacon pieces and grated cheese between each.

      dsc03613 tarts1

      Pour the cream mixture into each case, taking care not to overfill, you just want to surround the fillings.

      tarts2

      tarts3

      Bake in the oven for 20-22 minutes until golden.

      Release from the tin and allow to cool on a wire rack.

      Serve warm or cold.

      dsc03576

      Bacon Gruyere and Tomato Tartlets

      Ruth Clemens, Baker Extraordinaire

      The post Bacon Gruyere & Tomato Tartlets first appeared on Baking, Recipes and Tutorials – The Pink Whisk.

      What is the Restricted Area in Basketball (Full Explanation)

      The newest line that’s been added to a basketball court isn’t very big, but it’s a very important one for players, coaches, and referees alike.

      It’s the small arc located in the lane and it’s there to designate what is referred to as the “restricted area” on the court.

      In this article, I will dive into what exactly the restricted area is, why this line has been added to the court, and how you can coach your players to use it to their advantage.

      Done with the 90s? Pacers in der Sackgasse? Macht Jaylen Brown zu viel?

      Done with the 90s: Dummer WWW-Beef oder bittere Wahrheit? Pacers in einer Sackgasse? Ist Jaylen Browns Rolle zu groß? All diese und viele andere Fragen beantwortet die neue Folge!

      Und holt euch auf jeden Fall die 15% Rabatt auf BetterGuards – die revolutionäre intelligente und mit der NBA entwickelte Sprunggelenksbandage : https://betterguards.de/DUNKMIT50

      Hier geht es zum … Fragenpod

      The post Done with the 90s? Pacers in der Sackgasse? Macht Jaylen Brown zu viel? first appeared on Got Nexxt – Der NBA und Basketball Podcast.